Summer Schools

FRIB-TA Summer Schools

Overview

The FRIB Theory Alliance has introduced the FRIB-TA summer school programs, which bring together graduate students, postdoctoral researches, and senior scientific experts to focus on topics relevant to the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams science. The programs are hosted at FRIB.

All materials for the FRIB-TA summer school on formal scattering is now online!
Use link https://fribtascattering.github.io/
The FRIB-TA Summer School: A Practical Walk Through Formal Scattering Theory: Connecting Bound States, Resonances, and Scattering States in Exotic Nuclei and Beyond was held online from August 4 to 6, 2021. The school focused on scattering theory, the framework that connecting seemingly different phenomena of the quantum world such as stable bound states, resonances, elastic scattering, and reactions. It has applications in many areas of physics, ranging from hadrons and nuclear physics to the description of ultracold atomic systems. In particular, scattering theory provides the foundation for few- and many-body approaches that solve quantum problems from first principles, and it is an essential ingredient for the description of low-energy nuclear reactions that will be studied at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

This summer school offered an introduction to nonrelativistic quantum scattering theory, discussing its fundamental assumptions and techniques guided by concrete applications. Formal aspects, centered around the important concept of the S-matrix, were covered in detail, complemented at each step by numerical illustrations and hands-on programming exercises.
For additional information visit the website, https://indico.frib.msu.edu/event/43/


Previous Summer Schools

FRIB-TA Summer School: “A practical walk through formal scattering theory: Connecting bound states, resonances, and scattering states in exotic nuclei and beyond”
Scattering theory is a framework connecting seemingly different phenomena of the quantum world such as stable bound states, resonances, elastic scattering, and reactions. It has applications in many areas of physics, ranging from hadrons and nuclear physics to the description of ultracold atomic systems. In particular, scattering theory provides the foundation for few- and many-body approaches that solve quantum problems from first principles, and it is an essential ingredient for the description of low-energy nuclear reactions that will be studied at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).

This summer school will offer an introduction to nonrelativistic quantum scattering theory, discussing its fundamental assumptions and techniques guided by concrete applications. Formal aspects, centered around the important concept of the S-matrix, will be covered in detail, complemented at each step by numerical illustrations and hands-on programming exercises.

At the end of this three-day course, participants will have a firm understanding of the basic concepts of scattering theory, how they relate to a variety of few-and many-body quantum systems, and how they can be implemented numerically for simple examples.

Organizers and Lecturers:
* Kevin Fossez (ANL)
* Sebastian Koenig (NCSU)
* Heiko Hergert (MSU)

Date and location:
August 4-6, 2021 virtual

Applications are now accepted at FRIB Theory Alliance Summer School: A Practical Walk Through Formal Scattering Theory: Connecting Bound States, Resonances, and Scattering States in Exotic Nuclei and Beyond.

To ensure an effective learning experience, applicants are expected to be familiar with the concepts of quantum theory at the level of a typical two-semester graduate course. We furthermore require prior experience with programming in Python. The Organizers/Lectures will select a class of 20 -25 students from the pool of applications.

FRIB Theory Alliance Summer School: Dense matter in Astrophysics, June 30 – July 2, 2020
The FRIB-TA Summer School: Dense matter in Astrophysics took place in an on-line format due to travel restrictions surrounding Covid-19. The school focuses on dense matter in astrophysics, such as the matter in the interior of neutron stars and the one created in supernova explosions and neutron star mergers, along with comparisons with the matter created in laboratories. There were lectures from the following experts, together with interactive activities:
* Veronica Dexheimer (Kent State University): introduction to modeling the core of neutron stars
* Luke Roberts (Michigan State University): the physics of supernova explosions and neutron star mergers
* Pawel Danielewicz (Michigan State University): laboratory constraints for the equation of state of neutron stars
* Rodrigo Negreiros (Federal Fluminense University, Brazil): general relativity (including the formalism to describe stellar rotation and magnetic fields) and stellar cooling
* Thomas Klähn (California State University Long Beach): deconfined quarks and phase transitions in the core of neutron stars
For additional information visit the website.
FRIB Theory Alliance Summer School: Machine Learning Applied to Nuclear Physics
The school, held from 20-23 May, was titled "Machine learning applied to nuclear physics." It brought together graduate students, postdoctoral researches, and senior scientific experts. They work in nuclear physics, mathematics, computer science, and related areas. They came together to discuss an important emerging science, how it applies to nuclear science, and reviewed publications on machine learning.
Hosted by scientists from universities and national laboratories, the summer school had nearly one hundred attendees. Students came from all over the United States, as well as Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Norway.
For additional information about the program visit the "Machine learning applied to nuclear physics" program website.
FRIB Theory Alliance Summer School: Neutron star mergers for non-experts: GW170817 in the multi-messenger astronomy and FRIB eras
The FRIB Theory Alliance hosted a summer school at FRIB entitled "Neutron star mergers for non-experts: GW170817 in the multi-messenger astronomy and FRIB eras" from May 16 to May 18, 2018. It brought together graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and senior scientific experts working in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy and related areas to discuss the impact of the GW170817 neutron star merger on nuclear science and nuclear astrophysics. An MSU Today article gives details of the school, which was also livestreamed to remote participants.